Author Topic: Buying an H-700  (Read 1244 times)

joeblow

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2020, 07:57:16 AM »
The Rayjay guys are not going to sell new kits anymore. They are only trying to support the older systems. So going turbo on any Helio engine combination is out unless it has it already. Plus I thought trying to keep GO engines was expensive and getting harder to find parts for? 

The fuel burn issue with the TIO-540 is an issue but again I assume more of one flying at 10K feet than at altitude where it would sip fuel compared to a GO at 10K feet, no? Plus at least you can get parts and overhaul them vs the GO engines?

Anybody have anything on the gear legs? I have read there was an STC but I guess the owner is MIA?

Louis

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2020, 12:02:44 PM »
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration
14 CFR Part 39
Amendment 39-5533; AD 87-04-09

Airworthiness Directives; Helio Model H-700 and H-800 Airplanes
AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT

DATES: Effective March 9, 1987.
87-04-09 HELIO: Amendment 39-5533. Applies to Models H-700 and H-800 airplanes (all serial numbers) certificated in any category.

Compliance: Required as indicated, unless already accomplished.

To assure airworthiness of the composite main landing gear legs, accomplish the following:

(a) Within the next 100 hours TIS after the effective date of this AD and each 100 hours TIS thereafter, remove landing gear fairings, if installed, and visually inspect the edges of the composite main landing gear legs for evidence of delamination. Delamination is evidenced by longitudinal splitting between the fiberglass plies. This could occur anywhere along the span of the landing gear leg. If any delamination is found, prior to further flight, install FAA-approved right and left metallic landing gear legs. NOTE: On the effective date of this AD, the only known FAA-approved replacement landing gear is per STC SA2171CE.

(b) If, in between the inspections required in paragraph (a) above, it is observed that the wings do not appear level, or one side of the airplane appears to be drooping, prior to further flight, conduct the inspections and replacement, If necessary, required in paragraph (a) of this AD.

(c) The inspection required in paragraphs (a) and (b) are no longer required when FAA-approved metallic landing gear legs have been installed.

(d) Ferry permits issued in accordance with FAR 21.197 and equivalent methods of compliance with this AD may be used if approved by the Manager, Wichita Aircraft Certification Office, Federal Aviation Administration, 1801 Airport Road, Room 100, Wichita, Kansas 67209; Telephone (316) 946-4400.

All persons affected by this directive may obtain copies of the documents referred to herein upon request to the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of the Regional Counsel, Room 1558, 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106.

This amendment becomes effective on March 9, 1987.

Doug Johnson

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2020, 02:18:48 PM »
Well since the Rajay is out for new installations unless you can find someone that has removed a RaJay or maybe the way to go is buy an H-250 or H-295 and use one of these 2 STCs or Like 2505 convert to a turbocharged version of  the 300hp Lyc IO-54OK1B5 with 3 bladed MT propeller.

I think both of these STCs are owned by Gordon Cragg as well as the one for the all metal gearlegs

STC SA1589CE mentioned in the STC for the TIO-540 is the 3800lb upgross


« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 02:38:43 PM by Doug Johnson »
Doug

joeblow

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2020, 09:05:37 PM »
Thank you guys for all your replies.

Is there any contact info for Gordon Cragg? I seem to remember having read that the 'owner of the Leg STC' was no longer around? Hopefully that was misinformation as both the 540s and legs would be of interest depending on which way I go.

Kevin Dunn

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2021, 03:38:07 PM »
Seems to me that the real issue here is the fact that your wife wants to go fast and far. Regardless of what is hanging off the front of a Helio, they have never been fast. Far is a different story, but still, when it comes to speed you will never compete with a 210, and certainly not with a 310, regardless.

I am a Helio nut....but they just aren't that fast. 

Kevin

Doug Johnson

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2021, 05:12:54 PM »
That Helio nut fits me as well. Maybe not fast but faster would be nice but it would take some doing.

One of the first was the exhaust induction system which was phased out because of maintenance problems but with modern materials would be practical to reintroduce.

On one of the H-391s still flying it has been redesigned and is still working with no problem or so I've been told. It also decreases the engine noise outside the aircraft not so much inside the aircraft but that is what noise cancelling head sets are for.

The factory has played around with some speed enhancments in the past on Helio c/n 503. They did an Aerodynamic clean up with fairings at the wing crash-cage/fuselage juncture and fairing at wing trailing edge to square the entry forward of flap; flush door hinges on the pilot ans passenger door; fairing for landing gear strut wheel juncture and wheel cowlings; flush riveted slats with gap seal plug between each pair to create a smooth wing leading edge with minimal gaps when closed, Aerodynamic clean ups were retained on c/n 503 only, but most Factory installed aerodynamic clean ups were discontinued because of cost benefit ratio.

Then Jaars did some work on an stc to try to reclaim some speed lost with installing the baggage pod. some of them actually worked using c/n 558 was used for STC development and to explore enhancements to cruise speed by changes in air scoops and the use aerodynamic firings to reduce drag, developing Jaars aerodynamic enhancement (speed mod STC SA00788AT.

Then the 2nd Factory also modified, H-5 with installation of some aerodynamic speed mods wheel fairing and a more aerodynamic cowling rmoving the lts in the cowling and replacing themwith wing mounted dual fold down landing lts (similar to the stallion location) and Madras droop wing tips to replace the useless factory installed tips.

I personally played around with the Helio an removed the com antenas and replaced them with bent whips inside the wing tips and removed the rotating beacon and replaced with a red stroped faired into the top of the rudder. I didnt realy notice any increase in speed but did notice a slight decrease in fuel burn.

And then there is the Wren SRX-1 a helio inspired mod http://flyhelio.com/smf/index.php?topic=1333.msg5612#msg5612


Helio may still hold the highest ratio of stall speed to cruise speed of any light plane
be great to actually come up with an STC to increase this ratio.

If you do some searches of this site for speed mods and related words a lot of stuff has been already covered.


« Last Edit: January 20, 2021, 01:27:50 PM by Doug Johnson »
Doug

paullapoint

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2021, 09:03:54 PM »
If you’re looking for something fast, there’s a Meyers 200D on Barnstormers right now. They cruise at 200 mph but have large Fowler flaps and large tires for getting in and out of 2000’ farms strips. Only aircraft in history without any airframe AD’s. Tube frame with aluminum skin similar to the Helio so it’s very well built.   Paul

Doug Johnson

Re: Buying an H-700
« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2021, 01:46:55 PM »
But what about that 1000 ft farmers strip like my cousins with powerlines at each end if loaded heavy you go under and for me the pucker factor is bad.  If loaded light you can turn either direction as soon as you are 20' off rhe ground.

I just wanted an aircraft with a slow flying Helio wing that would go faster, and the faster the better.

The one thing you have to remember about farm strips they are mostly built on quarter sections 1320 feet long unless diagonal which is unususl and few on half sections max of 2640 and then you have the trees on the end or the powerlines for irrigation, and neighbors buildings which if you fly to close to can generate complaints to the FAA.
Doug