Author Topic: Crosswind Limitation  (Read 4048 times)

lbpa18

Crosswind Limitation
« on: December 30, 2010, 08:02:03 PM »
1. Why would an airplane that had so much R&D on aerodynamics have such a low crosswind capability? Why not a wider-chord rudder once it was discovered as being less capable? Surely others have been frustrated by this limitation and someone must have attempted to make an aerodynamic fix in the days of a less adversarial FAA. It couldn't be done now.

2. By using less flaps on a high-crosswind day, even though giving up the short landing, would have resulted in a higher touchdown speed resulting a higher airflow over the rudder and making it more effective countering the crosswind. Are there tried and true techniques to make this less of a limitation... other than lining up diagonally on a given landing surface?

Louis

Re: Crosswind Limitation
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2011, 02:21:57 PM »
May be that's why the tail was changed on the Stallion and the twin.  More moveable surface compare to to the fixed one.

Louis
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 02:29:46 PM by Louis »

mrhelio

  • Guest
Re: Crosswind Limitation
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2011, 06:35:46 AM »
Actually the Stallion was outsourced from the twin with a swept surface, a lot of the components from the twin were integrated into the Stallion. There is a definite difference in behavior with the Stallion compared to the Courier especially in AOA and slow flight.

Ken Berger

Re: Crosswind Limitation
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2011, 01:14:17 AM »
I think every experienced Helio pilot will have a different perspective on the crosswind limitation issue.  One thing that I have noticed is that after a while, it is not really as big factor as you might think, as long as the wind isn't too adverse, and not variable.  For instance, you can often fly straight in (while being unable to hold crosswind correction) and then fly more straight into the wind once you are in the runway enviornment.  Because the plane is flying so slow by then, you can still land diagonal to the runway without running out of space.

You can use the same technique on takeoff (in reverse) from a wide runway but it is much less concerning.  Just point it into the wind diagonal to the runway, start at the downwind side of the runway and if the wind is 12 knots or more and you are lightly loaded I bet you'll be off the ground by the time you cross the centerline.


The tougher situation is when you are heavilly loaded and landing when the wind exceeds the crosswind component.  This is especially dangerous on a narrow runway.  I then look for taxiways that are aligned with the wind or alternate airports.
Ken

391stol

Re: Crosswind Limitation
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 10:56:26 AM »
I cant remember the last time a landed at a airport/runway. Just my home grass/dirt strip. everything else is off airport.

Ken Berger

Re: Crosswind Limitation
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2011, 09:26:48 PM »
I find that handling the crosswind on grass is easier than pavment.  You get high drag and usually a lot more width to track the wind at the last minute.
Ken