Author Topic: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A  (Read 14493 times)

Doug Johnson

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2012, 10:08:19 PM »
Interesting way to look at it, I not sure exactly what you mean it doesn't count. H-22 carries a qualifier as incomplete when the factory closed.

It was assigned a construction number by the factory H-22 and given a data plate, my understanding is that it had registration number N392H when it was acquired and completed by Maytag, who also owns the type certificate, next it was a radial powered experimental N400HE then it was registered experimental N666X by Jergins with an M-601 turbine and now its back to experimental N400HE with a different turbine with the Pima AZ sheriffs dept. 

I believe if David had left the original engine in it he could have gotten it inspected and certified, if he had wanted to expend the effort.

H-19,20,21,&23 were also in the construction line, but they weren't completed.

I think since it was almost factory complete and  David Maytag finished it you have to call it the last Helio or just pretend its doesn't exist.

If this is the wrong way to look at it in your opinion, let me know, but it's the way I see it.

Doug

« Last Edit: March 09, 2012, 03:59:51 PM by Doug Johnson »
Doug

agpilotkm

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2012, 11:27:20 PM »
I am surprised to learn that they put ventral fins on Helios, they have such a tall and large vertical stabilizer I thought they wouldn't need it.  I had a Murphy Rebel on amphibs and never had any problems in a cross wind.  I thought it was the easiest airplane I have ever owned to land in a cross wind on the pavement because of wide stance and four wheels on the grounds.  With the free castering nose wheels I could even land a little crooked and let it crab into the wind on touch down with no trouble. 

Thanks for the info. 

Ken
Kenny Meines
agpilotkm
H-295 #1249

Doug Johnson

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2012, 08:22:30 AM »
Ken,
I've been waiting for Louis or someone with float experience to answer. I read Louis' post carefully and as I understand it the problem is only with amphibs out of the water. The amphibs give to much vertical surface in front of the horizontal turning axis. The wind pushes the nose away from the wind instead of causing it to turn into it. Normally the wind against the tail causes the nose to weathervane into the wind. In the water on straight floats or on the amphibs a large portion of that vertical surface is below water and you have the water rudders to help you and as you pick up speed the moveable rudder becomes more effective.

I suspect although Louis did not say so, that the ventral fins would be helpful, even on straight floats (although not necessary or required), in slow flight  because of the small size of the movable rudder on the Helio, when you are forced to land or take off cross wind in the water.

I think its the ratio of movable rudder to vertical surface. One of the reasons other than looks for adding the dorsal fin to my 1200 series Helio was float operation I'm surprised that the interceptors weren't enough though.

Doug
« Last Edit: March 07, 2012, 08:49:19 AM by Doug Johnson »
Doug

davedietz

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2012, 12:51:04 PM »
I cannot think of any worse for floats on a Helio than more vertical area on the tail area.  On straight floats more than a 6 kt left cross wind in not manageable. However with the Helio in a 6 kt wind you just take off into the wind with a very short take off run

Dave

Doug Johnson

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2012, 03:57:41 PM »
David,
Glad to see your post. I've got a serious question. I have very little float experience in anything.

My Helio was a 1200 series. I liked the looks of the 1400 dorsal fin and I was told it might be helpful in float operation might even help airflow around the base of the tail. JAARS said it made no difference in airflow. I built and put the dorsal fin on. I was wanting to go to amphibs because I was flying between NE and Anchorage. Float operation are only allowed on one Lake in the entire state of NE so I was looking at amphibs.

Are you saying that once in the water the Dorsal and Ventral Fins are more hurtful then helpful and my  putting the dorsal fin on was probably a mistake?

By the way I took a bunch of pictures of the tail of your airplane because you had the original Helio sun logo and I wanted to put the logo just in front of the numbers on mine when I painted it. I also liked your purple stripe and intended to do something similar with dark grey and purple.

I never got to the paint Job before I sold it but Jay Harrison put a nice paint job on it. I believe it's stored around Anchorage some where for the winter on floats since it's such a pain to covert back to wheels.

Doug


« Last Edit: March 11, 2012, 03:54:25 PM by Doug Johnson »
Doug

gearedone

  • Guest
Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2012, 10:14:49 AM »
N5459E was a Helio H-295 Super Courier c/n # 1202 and was involved in a fatal accident March 12, 1970.

That airplane is not an H250 as noted on airport-data.com

You might want to look into that..

Ken Berger

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2012, 10:42:48 AM »
Getting back to the question of the ventril fins, I flew my Helio H295 on amphibs and without the fins.  I certainly didn't feel they were needed.

Ken
Ken

Doug Johnson

Re: Helio Installation on EDO 3500A
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2012, 12:54:51 PM »
I also had 1201 mixed up with 2506. I received an email and we figured out the error with 1201 and I noticed 1202 was mixed up with 2516. I went to Airport Data and put a correction in for both.

We really need Louis to give us more on the ventral fin.

Doug
Doug