Author Topic: tungsten bucking bars  (Read 5332 times)

391stol

tungsten bucking bars
« on: November 06, 2011, 07:39:38 PM »
I have been using some new tungsten bucking bars on my helio projects for tight spots and must say they are the real deal they are so much more heavier than steel they save the fingers on those tigh areas and make the easy areas that much more easier.   With my wife being my riveting/bucking partner they save marrages ,the family that rivets together stays together.  Bottom line is tungsten bucking bars are worth the extra money.

Doug Johnson

Re: tungsten bucking bars
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2011, 01:06:04 PM »
John,
I happened to be looking in Aircraft Spruce the other day and remembered this post I saw you could buy the 4 most common made from a ductile iron for about a 100 dollars. I thought spruce had everything, but no tungsten. Spruce claims you want heat treated ductile iron so they can be easily repolished how does tungsten compare in that area.

Where do you find them and how much?

Doug
Doug

391stol

Re: tungsten bucking bars
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2011, 03:15:51 PM »
http://www.tungsten-bucking-bar.com/prices.html
They are much harder than steel/iron so i believe they would not need to be polished. I am sure you could polish them if needed.

Doug Johnson

Re: tungsten bucking bars
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2011, 05:57:16 PM »
John,
I checked prices and they are not for the guy building a kit. These are for the Pro that intends to use them for a lifetime.

I would probably need a chip in them so I could find them like the ones they have for lost car keys. You'd have to get over the bad habit of not picking your tools up every night too.

But If you were going to buy just 1 multipurpose bar to use in those tight spots where you really need the weight because you psychically just can't get a steel one into the spot which one would you buy? Like the one for the blind spot where you guide it into place with your fingertips and you just know it's going to bounce and pinch your fingers.

I looked at their other products they have a poly to mix with powdered tungsten to make a "room temperature sintered tungsten" to replace lead weights.

Just before Helio closed the last time they were looking into making slats and movable rudder and ailerons out of composite.

This poly and powdered Tungsten seems ideal for aileron and rudder weights in a composite construction.

Doug
Doug

391stol

Re: tungsten bucking bars
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2011, 08:39:23 PM »
I have 4 different ones from them. to cover all bases all of them are for tight places. I dont think there is just one that covers them all. long skinny one and short square ones are what i have some with angles on them. They are pricey but worth it.

Doug Johnson

Re: tungsten bucking bars
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2011, 12:34:40 PM »
The tungsten bucking bars are twice as heavy as the same size steel bars. The Idea of using tungsten for weights instead of lead I find especially fascinating I compared it to lead and found this;

The Top 10 Reasons Why Tungsten Is Better Than Lead
                                               by Gil Sery
 1)Environmentally Friendly
Tungsten is much more environmentally friendly than lead. In fact, according to the U.S. Government's Priority List of Hazardous Substances, lead is the second most hazardous substance (Arsenic being #1).
2)Higher Density
Lead has a density of about 10 g/cc, but with tungsten, you can achieve densities of up to 18.6 g/cc! Higher density means smaller parts for the same weight.

 3)Non-Toxic Alternative
Lead has already been phased out of kids’ toys, electronics, and electrical equipment. New regulations for lead paint removal go into effect in April 2010. At some point all lead use will be phased out, so why not get a jump on finding environmentally-friendly lead alternatives, like tungsten?
 4)Hardness
Tungsten comes in many alloys. From a machinable alloy to a diamond-hard one. The alloy can be tailored to each specific application. Wear resistance and heat resistance are just two of hundreds of suitable applications.
 5)Highest Melting Point
Despite its incredible hardness, tungsten can still be melted. However, at 6170°F (3410°C), tungsten has the highest melting point of any metal.
 6)Versatility
Due to its high density and high melting point, tungsten is as versatile as lead, if not more so. Tungsten can be used as a lead replacement for a variety of applications:
   a)Ammunition (tungsten shot),
   b)Industrial (flywheels, cases, dies, rods, plates)
   c)Jewelry (rings, bracelets)
   d)Radiation Shielding (the protective mats radiologists use when taking your x-rays)
   e)Sport (darts, golf clubs, fishing weights and lures)
   f)Stationery (the tips used in ballpoint pens)
   g)Weights (smaller balance weights, wheel weights)
 7)Cheap Disposal
Since Tungsten is environmentally friendly, there, are no federally mandated disposal costs associated with getting rid of tungsten, as there are with lead.
 8)Recyclable
Tungsten parts are manufactured from powder using a powder metallurgy process. This allows each tungsten part to be recycled back to its original powder form. The recycling cost is relatively small and the process is well known and available in every country. There is a very small loss in tungsten recycling.
 9)Highly Corrosion Resistant
Like lead, tungsten has excellent corrosion resistance, and is only attacked slightly by most mineral acids.
 10)Appearance. Tungsten alloys can be plated and polished, thereby offering a wide variety of finishes.
Doug